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Tuesday, February 26, 2013

Weekend Low-cost to Hiking & Skiing 2 to 3 March/2013 in the city of Puka with Eksploruesit - "Albania Beauty"


.Hiking & Skiing 2 to 3 March in the city of Puka

Puke is the capital city of Puka district in northern Albania. At 835 meters above sea level, the city is one of the highest in altitude areas in Albania and is a popular area for skiing. Situated 140 km from Tirana (about 2 hours 30 minutes by car). City's first tracks found in ancient named Picarea, during the VI century - II PK, which was later destroyed by a barbarian invasion. The city has been njhohur named Pezhve later and has a tradition almost 2'000 years in resin sculptures. Remnants of this tradition are located in the quarter of the city and also the city is surrounded by a fabulous pine forest of a 400 hectare area, a factor that makes this area hiking gem where the images provided are stunning. Situated at the expense of the Alps, this country has been the host of the colossus Albanian letters Migjeni, where the school where he taught has become a tourist attraction. In short northern city is a gastronomic cultural turzimsit socket (where traditional culinary will be felt in every meal) and adventuresk - where hiking through snow and skiing will be the subject of our 2-day stay in Puka.
G u i d e !
Date March 2:
• Starting at 8:00 to "Mother Teresa" after traveling for 2 hours will make a stop at the edge of Lake Vau Dejes. Perla restaurant, we will have breakfast and coffee to legislate them sleep any gjumashi: P
Around 11:30 we reach the town of Puka where after sistemohemi through rooms, choose ski equipment is down in the area 2 minutes from eat to take the first ski lessons (as braking and Marj curves).
• At 14:30 will have lunch with traditional culinary area.
• At 16:00 will ask some options:
a) For ski lovers can ski down again
b) Courses for hiking lovers will be holding a special guide through the snow with rare footage panorameske
• For the afternoon we thought a tourist walk in the city and also some development policy "social game" called "energizers"
• At 21:00 we will have dinner while respecting the country's gastronomic tradition (with meat goat, offering, mishmash ajk milk and corn flour, etc etc).
• After dinner will be a party to Check Point: P, alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages and where the only lighting hall will be the light of the fireplace. For music? No worries, DJ and provided we have with them: D. The evening will continue until as "Last Mohikanve" be smart ☺

Date March 3rd:
• Not to be broken sleep in the morning: D at 10:00 we will have breakfast and where after coffee gjumashe: P, will receive a ski equipped but this time will spostohemi in a runway tjeëter (15 - 20 minutes away), to test if there are any undiscovered talent skier among us.
• At 14:00 hours we will have lunch.
• Once greet with the city, at 15:00 will be depart to Tirana.
• At 18:00 arrive in Tirana, love to sleep but filled with unforgettable memories ☺


We inform you that in order to have enough time available for preparations, reservations will be closed on Friday at 12:00.
You expect to spend a special weekend together ☺

PS from a trip mëpërparshëm (note not ours) to create an idea of ​​what fun awaits us this weekend: D. In our video will publish on Monday with key stakeholders you ☺


For more information you can follow us on our fan page on facebook.
Reservations can always be made to:
C: 0693771019
E: eksploruesit_albania@hotmail.com
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Eksploruesit-Albanian-Beauty/429085597157722

Albania on horseback: in the footsteps of Lord Byron


Minty Clinch explores Albania as Lord Byron saw it, from the back of a horse. Just as in the poet’s day, the country remains an uncharted, friendly land that is full of surprises .

Albania on horseback: in the footsteps of Lord Byron
"Riding holidays often settle into a routine, mornings and afternoons in the saddle, a picnic lunch, an evening campsite and dinner under the stars, but Albania is a land of the unexpected" 
With the thermometer hovering around 40C (104F), we negotiated the mountain track to Hoshteva. The white stones reflected the noonday sun as we urged our horses round the last bends into the village. To the left a handsome Orthodox church, straight ahead a sign for a café bar. No prizes for guessing which we visited first. In such a remote spot, we hardly dared to hope for refrigeration as we tied our horses up under the trees. Miracle of miracles, we found it. Korça beer or Coca-Cola, glugged down on a shady veranda, have rarely tasted so good.
On this occasion, our group of British horsemen – a banker and his wife, an antiques dealer and a social worker – had the advantage over Lord Byron and his Cambridge friend, John Cam Hobhouse, pioneering long-riders in the mountains of southern Albania in 1809. In peace time, the odd couple would have made the Grand Tour through France and Italy, but the Napoleonic Wars prompted a more ambitious adventure, starting in the brothels of Lisbon, sailing across the Mediterranean to Greece and riding north to Tepelenë, home of the despotic Ali Pasha, who proved an unexpectedly generous host.
This agenda was no hardship for the bisexual Byron: at the age of 23, he welcomed the Levant’s potential for passions that were illegal back home. His journey inspired “Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage”, the poem that created the Byronic hero, intemperate, self-indulgent and irresistible. While he worked on his immortality, poor Hobhouse, described as “short, plain, furtive and unhygienic”, charted their progress in more pedestrian terms.
“A great deal depends on your choice of dragoman because he is your managing man,” he wrote in his diaries. “He must procure your lodging, food, horses and all conveniences.” We had our own dragoman, a thoroughly Ottoman Mr Fixit, in Auron Tere, resident in Michigan, but born into the upper echelons of Albanian society in Gjirokastër, a fortified town that made it onto the Unesco World Heritage roll of honour in 2008.
Albania, its independence guaranteed by the 1913 Treaty of London, claims that it’s the only country in the world surrounded by its own rightful territory. If the people are to be believed, it has been systematically land grabbed over the century of its existence by its neighbours, currently Montenegro, Kosovo, Macedonia and Greece. What remains is a country with a population of around three million, 70 per cent Muslim, the rest Orthodox Christian and Catholic. It has the last barely touched Mediterranean beaches in Europe and a disproportionate number of car washes. It’s no accident that immigrant Albanians dominate that particular roadside trade in Britain.
In the mid 20th century, Enver Hoxha, another son of the Gjirokastër elite, gave it a very bad press. The Stalinist dictator ruled with an iron fist from 1944 until his death in 1985. Five years later, Albania established the fragile democracy that exists today. Although Hoxha’s brutal legacy persists in authoritarian politics and contempt for the rule of law, the country now welcomes visitors warmly, just as it did in Byron’s day.
After we’d visited Gjirokastër’s medieval castle and Hoxha’s luxurious birthplace, Auron drove us south towards Greece, veering off road into a meadow where we found our fellow travellers, Fuat and Gus, supervising a row of sturdy horses. Briskly Auron unloaded English-style saddles from his Land Cruiser, placed them on small, hairy backs and allocated steeds to riders. Nelson, tiny, shiny and fiery, was reserved for Dom Mocchi, our effervescent Italian leader. Mandela or the Admiral? Auron shrugged: either way, it was the perfect name for a black one-eyed horse.
Riding holidays often settle into a routine, mornings and afternoons in the saddle, a picnic lunch, an evening campsite and dinner under the stars, but Albania is a land of the unexpected. On day one, we rode down an avenue of cypress trees to the Bektashi monastery at Melan to meet our first dervish. Not the whirling kind of popular imagination, but a Sufi mystic who had embraced the Bektashi celibate life in 2000 at the age of 15.
Now a bearded adult dressed in silky white robes belted in green and gold, Myrteza lives with his mother in an outsize monastery overlooking the Drino river valley. The dramatic mountainscape is interrupted by a metal tower at the end of the terrace. In the modern era, the archaic dervish lifestyle, its emphasis on study and prayer, is more viable when a mobile phone company picks up the tab.
Unfortunately Myrteza’s studies don’t include foreign languages but he welcomed the break provided by passing strangers with smiling enthusiasm. While he chain- smoked, his mother served tea and raki, not the aniseed-based Turkish kind, but a fruit schnapps resembling grappa. Other Muslims consider Bektashi Sufism heretical. During this relaxed interlude, it was easy to see why.
Back on Nelson in an elated mood, Dom went ever higher up the hillside, bushwhacking an arduous trail through rocks and shrubs rather than sticking to the path. As an Italian, he shared linguistic links, a zest for life and an indomitable spirit of adventure with our Albanian hosts, so riding in his wake was never boring.
In Libohovë, a large village dominated by the remains of Ottoman fortifications, we ate under the 250-year-old tree that sheltered the terrace of the only restaurant. Just like Byron? Who knows, but it would have been large enough when he passed this way.
History insists that he rode over our next day’s destination, the ancient site of Antigonea, though he wouldn’t have known it because excavations didn’t start until the Sixties. The ruins of a major Greek trading city founded by King Pyrrhus of Epirus in 295BC and burned by the Romans a century later are the focus of a well presented National Archaeological Park. As a good dragoman should, Auron had acquired a prized pass for a group sleepover. While we rode, he’d been out foraging. Now the Land Cruiser returned laden with warm spit-roast chickens, savoury flaky pastries (burek), fresh bread, fruit and cold drinks. Let the feasting begin.
The climax of our ride was a three-day camping trip in the Bureto Mountains, starting in Erind and ending in the Kelcyra Gorge. Unexpectedly, Albania comes second to Finland in Europe’s per capita hydroelectric tables and much of that power is generated in this rainy, wooded area. The villages, built into the hillsides with walls and roofs hewn out of rock, are almost invisible until you ride into them. In most of them, we found Orthodox churches, often in poor repair but with icons lit by naked bulbs glowing in dark interiors.
Many of the younger residents have headed south to look for work, but those who remain opened their doors with smiles of delight. As the sun went down on a long day in the saddle, an 80-year-old granny, one of five year-round residents in a remote village, welcomed us onto her vine-shaded terrace and heated the coffee pot. Her son, on holiday from Athens, broke out a bottle of raki, a merry interlude that set us up for our first night in the open.
Now that we were adrift from civilisation, our camp set up by Fuat and Gus in a pasture high above the Vlose Valley, Auron was on the case full time. Pack horses transported tents, luggage and provisions, but our dragoman sourced water from pure springs, enormous circular loaves from village ovens, cheese and yogurt from mountain herds. Meatballs appeared as if by magic accompanied by tomatoes and cucumbers, a default Albanian meal that has a lot going for it.
Afterwards we fell asleep to the sound of horses chomping rich grass and wearing tinkling bells so they could be found in the morning. No lie-in, though: a dawn goat invasion was guaranteed, followed by a site inspection by curious villagers talking loudly in a language that sounds like fighting talk even when it isn’t.
All too soon it was time to descend from the uplands and rejoin Byron in a landscape that reminded him of his childhood home near Aberdeen. Just as he did, we rode along the turbulent Vlose, a startling turquoise green as it plunged through the Kelcyra Gorge. “Land of Albania. Let me bend mine eyes on thee, thou rugged nurse of savage men,” he wrote in “Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage” of the people that crystallised his innate revolutionary zeal. In Athens, his next destination, it would find an outlet in the struggle for Greek independence, a cause that dominated the rest of his life.
What of lesser men? We embraced the cool of a pretty riverside hotel as we tucked into trout newly caught from the river on a terrace bright with flowers. Nothing so poetic as the maestro, I’m afraid, but a fine end to a journey of discovery in a rewardingly uncharted land.
Albania Horse Trek: In the Footsteps of Lord Byron, from May 24 to June 1, 2013, costs £1,495, not including return international flight, with Wild Frontiers (020 7736 3968; wildfrontiers.co.uk).

The Blue Eye: 2012 Expedition


The Albanian Center for Marine Research is a leader in nautical archaeology in the Balkans. Our work is focused on locating and documenting ancient shipwrecks in the Ionian and Adriatic Seas. Our discoveries have attracted international recognition and interest due to the historial value of such truths coming to light.
We thank you for vising our website. Please take a moment to acquaint yourself with our work. We are always adding new content so check back often. We welcome your feedback about our work and website.

The Blue Eye: 2012 Expedition

  

The 2012 Blue Eye Expedition will mark the second year of survey in the famous Albanian spring.  Last season, the Center’s team conducted a feasibility survey and determined it is possible to conduct scientific diving in remote high flow underwater caves . The Blue Eye is a major feature in the landscape and oral histories dating back centuries tell stories of ritual sacrifice in the spring. Divers determined that a ledge at twenty meters acts as a catchment area for material deposited from the surface. Artifacts from several periods were found scattered along the ledge, indicating ritual use over several centuries. The upcoming field season will build on last season’s observations with help from the Center’s underwater field school, Titan Dive Gear, and media company Top Channel.

The underwater field school runs for three weeks from July 2-22 and is staffed by international specialists from Albania, Montenegro, Serbia, United States, and Denmark. The course is accredited by the American institution Transylvania University and trains graduate students from the Balkans and international universities in the underwater sciences. Students will take a break from the coastal survey to head inland and visit the Blue Eye, where they will learn about the many site types found in the field of underwater archaeology including submerged caves. The students will help provide surface support and documentation of the culturally rich area. Afterwards, they will have time to relax and enjoy the beautiful environs.

Titan Dive Gear (a leader in closed circuit rebreathers and dive lights) is sponsoring the Center’s research through equipment donation and providing an experienced cave diving videographer to document the research. High definition video will follow the team to the twenty-meter ledge and help document artifacts exposed as part of the non-invasive survey.

The expedition will also be documented by Top Channel, the leading technological media channel in Albania. High definition footage from outside and inside the spring will be broadcast as part of a documentary. The Top Channel documentary, available in Albanian and English, will provide the public with an intimate view of this beautiful and powerful cave as scientists battle the strong flow to bring the secrets of the Blue Eye to light for the first time.
2012 Expedition Partners:

Welcome to the Albanian Center for Marine Research

The Albanian Center for Marine Research is a leader in nautical archaeology in the Balkans. Our work is focused on locating and documenting ancient shipwrecks in the Ionian and Adriatic Seas. Our discoveries have attracted international recognition and interest due to the historial value of such truths coming to light.
We thank you for vising our website. Please take a moment to acquaint yourself with our work. We are always adding new content so check back often. We welcome your feedback about our work and website.
http://www.albaniamarinecenter.org/

Discovering and Preserving our Past

  
In our efforts to locate, document, and preserve underwater archaeological heritage sites, the Center adheres to the Charter on the Protection and Management of Underwater Cultural Heritage.

Charter on the Protection and Management of Underwater Cultural Heritage
Ratified by the 11th ICOMOS General Assembly, held in Sofia, Bulgaria, from 5-9 October 1996

Introduction:
This Charter is intended to encourage the protection and management of underwater cultural heritage in inland and inshore waters, in shallow seas and in the deep oceans. It focuses on the specific attributes and circumstances of cultural heritage under water and should be understood as a supplement to the ICOMOS Charter for the Protection and Management of Archaeological Heritage, 1990.
The 1990 Charter defines the "archaeological heritage" as that part of the material heritage in respect of which archaeological methods provide primary information, comprising all vestiges of human existence and consisting of places relating to all manifestations of human activity, abandoned structures, and remains of all kinds, together with all the portable cultural material associated with them. For the purposes of this Charter underwater cultural heritage is understood to mean the archaeological heritage which is in, or has been removed from, an underwater environment. It includes submerged sites and structures, wreck-sites and wreckage and their archaeological and natural context.

By its very character the underwater cultural heritage is an international resource. A large part of the underwater cultural heritage is located in an international setting and derives from international trade and communication in which ships and their contents are lost at a distance from their origin or destination.

Archaeology is concerned with environmental conservation; in the language of resource management, underwater cultural heritage is both finite and non-renewable. If underwater cultural heritage is to contribute to our appreciation of the environment in the future, then we have to take individual and collective responsibility in the present for ensuring its continued survival.

Archaeology is a public activity; everybody is entitled to draw upon the past in informing their own lives, and every effort to curtail knowledge of the past is an infringement of personal autonomy. Underwater cultural heritage contributes to the formation of identity and can be important to people's sense of community. If managed sensitively, underwater cultural heritage can play a positive role in the promotion of recreation and tourism.

Archaeology is driven by research, it adds to knowledge of the diversity of human culture through the ages and it provides new and challenging ideas about life in the past. Such knowledge and ideas contribute to understanding life today and, thereby, to anticipating future challenges.
Many marine activities, which are themselves beneficial and desirable, can have unfortunate consequences for underwater cultural heritage if their effects are not foreseen.

Underwater cultural heritage may be threatened by construction work that alters the shore and seabed or alters the flow of current, sediment and pollutants. Underwater cultural heritage may also be threatened by insensitive exploitation of living and non-living resources. Furthermore, inappropriate forms of access and the incremental impact of removing "souvenirs" can have a deleterious effect.

Many of these threats can be removed or substantially reduced by early consultation with archaeologists and by implementing mitigatory projects.
This Charter is intended to assist in bringing a high standard of archaeological expertise to bear on such threats to underwater cultural heritage in a prompt and efficient manner.

Underwater cultural heritage is also threatened by activities that are wholly undesirable because they are intended to profit few at the expense of many. Commercial exploitation of underwater cultural heritage for trade or speculation is fundamentally incompatible with the protection and management of the heritage. This Charter is intended to ensure that all investigations are explicit in their aims, methodology and anticipated results so that the intention of each project is transparent to all.

Article 1 - Fundamental Principles
The preservation of underwater cultural heritage in situ should be considered as a first option.

Public access should be encouraged.

Non-destructive techniques, non-intrusive survey and sampling should be encouraged in preference to excavation.

Investigation must not adversely impact the underwater cultural heritage more than is necessary for the mitigatory or research objectives of the project.

Investigation must avoid unnecessary disturbance of human remains or venerated sites.

Investigation must be accompanied by adequate documentation.
Article 2 - Project Design
Prior to investigation a project must be prepared, taking into account :

• the mitigatory or research objectives of the project;
• the methodology to be used and the techniques to be employed;
• anticipated funding;
• the time-table for completing the project;
• the composition, qualifications, responsibility and experience of the investigating team;
• material conservation
• site management and maintenance
• arrangements for collaboration with museums and other institutions
• documentation
• health and safety
• report preparation
• deposition of archives, including underwater cultural heritage removed during investigation
• dissemination, including public participation
The project design should be revised and amended as necessary.

Investigation must be carried out in accordance with the project design. The project design should be made available to the archaeological community.

Article 3 - Funding
Adequate funds must be assured in advance of investigation to complete all stages of the project design including conservation, report preparation and dissemination. The project design should include contingency plans that will ensure conservation of underwater cultural heritage and supporting documentation in the event of any interruption in anticipated funding.

Project funding must not require the sale of underwater cultural heritage or the use of any strategy that will cause underwater cultural heritage and supporting documentation to be irretrievably dispersed.
Article 4 - Time-table
Adequate time must be assured in advance of investigation to complete all stages of the project design including conservation, report preparation and dissemination. The project design should include contingency plans that will ensure conservation of underwater cultural heritage and supporting documentation in the event of any interruption in anticipated timings.

Article 5- Research objectives, methodology and techniques
Research objectives and the details of the methodology and techniques to be employed must be set down in the project design. The methodology should accord with the research objectives of the investigation and the techniques employed must be as unintrusive as possible.

Post-fieldwork analysis of artefacts and documentation is integral to all investigation; adequate provision for this analysis must be made in the project design.
Article 6 - Qualifications, responsibility and experience
All persons on the investigating team must be suitably qualified and experienced for their project roles. They must be fully briefed and understand the work required.

All intrusive investigations of underwater cultural heritage will only be undertaken under the direction and control of a named underwater archaeologist with recognised qualifications and experience appropriate to the investigation.
Article 7 - Preliminary investigation
All intrusive investigations of underwater cultural heritage must be preceded and informed by a site assessment that evaluates the vulnerability, significance and potential of the site.

The site assessment must encompass background studies of available historical and archaeological evidence, the archaeological and environmental characteristics of the site and the consequences of the intrusion for the long term stability of the area affected by investigations.
Article 8 - Documentation
All investigation must be thoroughly documented in accordance with current professional standards of archaeological documentation.

Documentation must provide a comprehensive record of the site, which includes the provenance of underwater cultural heritage moved or removed in the course of investigation, field notes, plans and drawings, photographs and records in other media.
Article 9 - Material conservation
The material conservation programme must provide for treatment of archaeological remains during investigation, in transit and in the long term.

Material conservation must be carried out in accordance with current professional standards.

Article 10 - Site management and maintenance

A programme of site management must be prepared, detailing measures for protecting and managing in situ underwater cultural heritage in the course of an upon termination of fieldwork. The programme should include public information, reasonable provision for site stabilisation, monitoring and protection against interference. Public access to in situ underwater cultural heritage should be promoted, except where access is incompatible with protection and management.
Article 11 - Health and safety
The health and safety of the investigating team and third parties is paramount. All persons on the investigating team must work according to a safety policy that satisfies relevant statutory and professional requirements and is set out in the project design.
Article 12 - Reporting
Interim reports should be made available according to a time-table set out in the project design, and deposited in relevant public records.

Reports should include:

• an account of the objectives
• an account of the methodology and techniques employed
• an account of the results achieved
• recommendations concerning future research, site management and curation of underwater cultural heritage removed during the investigation
Article 13 - Curation
The project archive, which includes underwater cultural heritage removed during investigation and a copy of all supporting documentation, must be deposited in an institution that can provide for public access and permanent curation of the archive. Arrangements for deposition of the archive should be agreed before investigation commences, and should be set out in the project design. The archive should be prepared in accordance with current professional standards.

The scientific integrity of the project archive must be assured; deposition in a number of institutions must not preclude reassembly to allow further research. Underwater cultural heritage is not to be traded as items of commercial value.

Article 14 - Dissemination
Public awareness of the results of investigations and the significance of underwater cultural heritage should be promoted through popular presentation in a range of media. Access to such presentations by a wide audience should not be prejudiced by high charges.

Co-operation with local communities and groups is to be encouraged, as is co-operation with communities and groups that are particularly associated with the underwater cultural heritage concerned. It is desirable that investigations proceed with the consent and endorsement of such communities and groups.

The investigation team will seek to involve communities and interest groups in investigations to the extent that such involvement is compatible with protection and management. Where practical, the investigation team should provide opportunities for the public to develop archaeological skills through training and education.

Collaboration with museums and other institutions is to be encouraged. Provision for visits, research and reports by collaborating institutions should be made in advance of investigation.

A final synthesis of the investigation must be made available as soon as possible, having regard to the complexity of the research, and deposited in relevant public records.
Article 15 - International co-operation
International co-operation is essential for protection and management of underwater cultural heritage and should be promoted in the interests of high standards of investigation and research. International co-operation should be encouraged in order to make effective use of archaeologists and other professionals who are specialised in investigations of underwater cultural heritage. Programmes for exchange of professionals should be considered as a means of disseminating best practice.

Illyrian Coastal Exploration Program

Recognizing a need to bring together researchers, academic and non-profit organizations, and governmental agencies, the Illyrian Coastal Exploration Program (ICEP) was conceptualized and created by RPM Nautical FoundationArchaeological Director, Dr. Jeffrey Royal. The mission of the program is to put together a comprehensive plan for discovering, documenting, and protecting the cultural material record in this entire region.
This region rose to economic and political dominance in the 5th century BCE and includes the modern lands of Albania, Montenegro, and southern Croatia. Since 2006, numerous sites of maritime significance have been discovered by RPM Nautical Foundation off the ancient Illyrian coastline.
Despite political boundaries, this program is a collaborative effort between many governmental and research agencies as well as individuals from academic organizations:


Ksamil Bay Artificial Reef Project: Cruiser 1, Torpedo 1-2


Late last year (2010), five de-commisioned Albanian Navy vessels were towed out from nearby Baza Saranda to Ksamil Bay and sunk as a seminal artificial reef project on the coastline. There are two 38 m cruisers, two 18 m torpedo boats, and a 17 m patrol boat in water depths ranging from 15 msw to 33 msw. We are currently documenting the succession of the biological communities associated with these wrecks.

This video shows the full length of one of the cruisers. Footage by Derek Smith/RPM Nautical Foundation.

Late last year (2010), five de-commisioned Albanian Navy vessels were towed out from nearby Baza Saranda to Ksamil Bay and sunk as a seminal artificial reef project on the coastline. There are two 38 m cruisers, two 18 m torpedo boats, and a 17 m patrol boat in water depths ranging from 15 msw to 33 msw. We are currently documenting the succession of the biological communities associated with these wrecks.

This video shows the full length of one of the torpedo boats. Footage by Derek Smith/RPM Nautical Foundation.

Blue Eye Archaeology/Biology Survey..This 2 minute clip shows Peter Campbell photographing archaeological artifacts and searching in the sediment at the 20 m ledge in the Blue Eye spring. We love Hydro Lights by Titan Dive Gear!

As part of the Albanian Coastal Survey 2011 Field Season, Dr. Adrian Anastasi from the Albanian Institute of Archaeology surveys one of the ancient wreck sites along the southern Albanian coast.

A fantastic underwater world in Sarande, Albania


The underwater world fascinates us all. It is only recently that it has become accessible to almost anyone. Have you ever imagined swimming with underwater creatures? With us you can make your dreams come true.
We train in the system developed by the pioneer of free-diving and the first producer of underwater films; Jacques-Yves Cousteau. He founded the CMAS federation (Confédération Mondiale des Activités Subaquatiques) that brings together amateur diving clubs form all over the World. CMAS is an organization for those passionate about diving, it puts emphasis on safety and friendship and not only recreation. Our aim is to teach you safe diving habits in a friendly atmosphere so you can continue to enjoy the sport for many years. That is why our training takes longer, we expect more from you and you do more dives in the course than in other organizations.
Dive locations Sarande

Route

http://www.butle-nurkowe.pl/wraki%20Saranda/index.html (beautiful photo underwater Saranda,Albania)

Wherever you are in the World, you'll find that it isn't difficult to get to our base in Saranda.
The reason it is easier than you think is because all you really have to do is get on a plane to Corfu. Saranda is only 10km across from the Greek island!
The connection is direct from many international airports, it is reasonably cheap and regular.
Upon leaving Corfu Airport a 10 min taxi ride will take you to the port, from which a ferry leaves twice a day to Saranda!
Once you arrive in Saranda a 5 min taxi ride will get you to your hotel.

Have a safe trip! See you in Saranda
Ferry Times
Corfu-Saranda9.00 (GT)16.00 (GT)
Saranda -Corfu9.00 (AT)13.00(AT)16.00(AT)
Cost= 19 EURO

Travel Time: 90 min /30 min   by Hydrofoil


Note:
The local time in Albania is Standard European Time which is 1 hour behind Greek time. Please check what time your plane arrives in Corfu and reserve a hotel room if the flight is a late one (We can help with hotel reservations upon request).

Torpedo boat S403 Albanian Navy torpedo boat sunk in August 2010, by the U.S. Navy under the program to organize military port Sarande and the creation of artificial reefs in the Gulf of Telranisit.






Peshkatarit 


Peshkatarit
 Shipwreck
The shipwreack lies in the port of Saranda. To see the photos please visit the gallery on the Polish sister page.


















Albania Butrint 2011 , Zwiastun filmu z wyprawy do Albanii 2011 kanał BUTRINT

Saturday, February 23, 2013

High Albania & Rock Tirana prezantojnë Harlem Shake Party


  • High Albania & Rock Tirana prezantojnë Harlem Shake Party!
    Kush: Alpinistë, Pjesëtarët të High Albania, dhe kushdo që ka qejf natyrën Shqiptare
    Çfarë: Qofte, Birrë, Shoqëri e këndshme, Kacavjerrje
    Kur: Të Enjten 28 Shkurt, ora 19:00
    KU: Rock Tirana Climbing Gym
    Sa Kushton: 300 lek për ha-pi-ngjitu sa të kesh fuqi :)
    Sillni me vete: Kostume (maska, slleping bag, paruke të çmëndura dhe kostume të ndryshme) për Harlem Party-n!


    High Albania & Rock Tirana presenting Harlem Shake Party!
    Who: climbers, high albania members, people who enjoy Albania’s nature
    What: qofte, drinks, climbing, socializing
    When: Thursday 28 February @ 19:00
    Where: Rock Tirana Climbing Gym
    How Much: 300 lek for all-you-can- eat-&-drink-&-climb :)
    Bring: a unique COSTUME (mask, sleeping bag, crazy hair, stormtrooper suit, hulk costume, etc.) for the Harlem Shake Dance Party!